New to Factoring?

For those who aren't familiar with factoring, it is basically a fast way to get cash to run your business.

Factoring is Not a Loan

When you send your customers an invoice, they usually have 30 days to pay you back. Factoring companies will give you the bulk of the cash up front, sometimes within 24 hours, and collect the payments from your customers themselves. Once the invoices are paid in full, you’ll get the balance left over, minus a small fee.

Factoring Doesn't Require Debt

Sounds simple enough – fast cash for your business – no loans, no debt.

So how do you go about choosing the best factoring company?

Not all of them are created equal. Not all of them will give you the same level of service you need to help grow your business.

Everyone claims they have the simplest rate structure in the industry, no long-term contracts, same day funding, no up-front fees, no monthly minimums or maximums, etc., etc., etc.

We also offer these same benefits, but we GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU that other factoring companies don’t.

Here’s Why We Are The Factoring Company You Need For Your Business

No other factoring company matches our level of superior service and offerings.

As you can see, we simply have more to offer you.

Other factoring companies don’t even compare.

And Not All Factoring Companies Can Say This:

More than half of our new business comes through client referrals.

So, Can Your Company Use Factoring?

Of Course! Companies of all sizes, from small privately-owned companies to large multi-national corporations, use factoring as a way to increase their cash flow. Factoring spans all industries, including trucking, transportation, manufacturing and distribution, textiles, oil and gas, staffing agencies and more.

Companies use the cash generated from factoring to pay for inventory, buy new equipment, add employees, expand operations—basically any expenses related to their business. Factoring allows a company to make quicker decisions and expand at a faster pace.

Unlike a bank loan, factoring has…

  • No principle or interest to pay over time
  • No debt to repay
  • Unlimited funding potential – no caps
  • Fast funding – no waiting months like at a bank
  • Approval is based on the strength of your clients, not your credit
  • Startups are welcome in using funding services

Some of the benefits you receive with factoring are:













































































































































































































































































































Information for the city of Tulsa


Tulsa, the second largest city in Oklahoma and seat of Tulsa County, is located in the northeast part of the state on the Arkansas River.Tulsa was settled in the 1830s by Creek Indians from Alabama who were forcibly sent to the area (then part of Indian Territory) under the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Creek medicine men planted ashes from their old home at the new site, and the Creeks named their new village Tulsy, meaning old town, in memory of their former home in Tallassee, Ala. In time, the village became the town of Tulsa.The coming of the first railroad in 1882 attracted white settlers to Tulsa, and the town developed into a cattle shipping center. When enormous oil deposits were discovered at nearby Red Fork in 1901 and at Glenn Pool in 1905, the city experienced rapid growth as a center of a booming petroleum industry. Tulsa was incorporated as a city in 1898 and chartered in 1908.Tulsa is the center of the state's petroleum and telecommunications industries and has a diversified economy.


Other important industries include aerospace, chemicals, computer parts, automobile glass, fabricated metals, and industrial machinery. The city became a major inland port when the Tulsa port of Catoosa opened in 1971The United States Oil and Gas Association, formerly the Mid Continent Oil and Gas Association, was founded in Tulsa on October 13, 1917, six months after the entry of the United States into World War I. At the time Tulsa called itself ""The Oil Capital of the World"". At its creation, the association worked to provide petroleum to the Allied forces. In the decades since its establishment, the association is recognized as a leading advocate for producers of domestic oil and gas.Though the oil industry has historically dominated Tulsa's economy, efforts in economic diversification have created a base in the sectors of aerospace, finance, technology, telecommunications, high tech, and manufacturing. The Tulsa International Airport (TUL) and the Tulsa Port of Catoosa, the nation's most inland seaport, connect the region with international trade and transportation.


An American Airlines maintenance base at Tulsa International Airport is the city's largest employer and the largest maintenance facility in the world, serving as the airline's global maintenance and engineering headquarters, while the Tulsa Port of Catoosa and the Tulsa International Airport house extensive industrial parks.Products from Tulsa manufacturers account for about 60% of Oklahoma's exports, and in 2001, the city's total gross product was in the top one third of metropolitan areas, states, and countries, with more than $29 billion in total goods, growing at a rate of $250 million each year. In 2006, magazine rated Tulsa as second in the nation in income growth, and one of the best cities in the country to do business with. Usually among the lowest in the nation in terms of cost of doing business, the Tulsa Metropolitan Area in 2005 was rated among the five lowest metropolitan areas in the United States for that category.


A number of large financial corporations are headquartered in Tulsa, . Meanwhile, there are 30 companies in Tulsa that employ more than 1,000 people, though small businesses make up more than 80% of the city's companies.During a national recession from 2001 to 2003, the city lost 28,000 jobs. In response, a development initiative, Vision 2025, promised to incite economic growth and recreate lost jobs. Projects spurred by the initiative promised urban revitalization, infrastructure improvement, tourism development, riverfront retail development, and further diversification of the economy. As of 2007, employment levels have surpassed pre recession heights and the city is in a significant economic development and investment surge. This economic improvement is also seen in Tulsa's housing trends which show an average of a 6% increase in rent in 2010. Since 2006, more than 28,000 jobs have been added to the city.[




Information for the state of Oklahoma

Cotton, formerly the leading cash crop of Oklahoma, has been succeeded by wheat; income from livestock, however, exceeds that from crops. Many minerals are found in Oklahoma, including coal, but the one that gave the state its wealth is oil. After the first well was drilled in 1888, the petroleum industry grew enormously, until Oklahoma City and Tulsa were among the great natural gas and petroleum centers of the world. Oil and gas have declined somewhat in importance today. Many of Oklahoma's factories process local foods and minerals, but its chief manufactures include nonelectrical machinery and fabricated metal products. Military bases and other government facilities are also important.



Before making your final decision and entering into a factoring agreement, check out the fees applicable and the terms of the contract. Both of these can vary a lot, depending on the factoring company and the industry it is serving. -Tulsa Factoring Companies




Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles


Effective Ways for Small Businesses to Avoid Cash Flow Problems


Without steady cash flow most businesses will fail to thrive, especially small businesses and start-ups. We’ve all heard the phrase ""Cash Is King"" and that’s certainly true for established businesses, but for new businesses just getting started cash flow is even more important. Sadly, many new businesses fail to realize just how devastating cash flow problems can be to a business trying to establish themselves in the market. In fact, many businesses die a sad and lonely death simply because of bad cash management, and these are businesses that would otherwise have survived had they not experienced cash flow problems. Statistics show that 82% of businesses fail because they were unable to manage their cash. That’s a tragic figure, especially when there are effective ways for new, small, and even large businesses to avoid these problems.


So, let’s take a look at some important rules that small businesses should be aware of to ensure they never have to face liquidity.


No. 1: It’s Cash That Sustains Business Growth


So many businesses don’t consider cash flow an issue because they see the orders flooding in; however, many growing companies do experience cash flow problems. Increased sales generally mean increased costs to deliver orders; plus, in order to support the new volume of business other sections of a business typically need to grow. Your business may appear to be highly successful as orders continue coming in, but keep in mind that the faster your business grows the more financing it will need.


No. 2: Margins Are Just Accounting - They’re Not Cash!


We know that accounting, and accountants, can be pretty creative with figures because there’s nothing shareholders and board members love more than hearing about the industry-leading margins you’re achieving; but your board members and shareholders are not the ones who have to find the money to meet payroll and pay your landlord. Margins don’t pay your employees. Your sales may be booked down when your customer’s order is delivered, but how long will it be before you receive payment? 30, 60, 90 days, or even longer? If your customers are not paying you and you’re struggling to pay your expenses, your business is now in survival mode. Keep in mind that you may have great accounting margins but still have an empty bank account.


No. 3: When You’re Selling B2B (Business-to-Business) Cash Flow Problems Will Likely Be Your First Issue


The more sales you make the more money you make, but when you’re selling B2B it’s not always that simple. Yes, you sell and deliver goods or services to another business and provide them with an invoice, and your customer will pay the invoice at a later date. But how much later? If you chase the business too hard for payment they’ll probably never work with you again, so you could receive payment months later. You’re not going to pass up businesses who buy with high volume, so you have no choice but to wait. So, you end up with a cash flow problem.


No. 4: Cash Flow Problems Can Occur Very Quickly


It doesn’t take much for cash flow management to become a serious problem, so monitor your cash flow very carefully. Determine how much of your working capital is locked into receivables, inventories, raw materials, and so on; and know exactly how much money is required to meet both your sales targets and operating expenses. You may have made the sales but that doesn’t mean you have the cash, and you may have paid for inventory but that doesn’t mean it’s automatically a cost of goods sold.


No. 5: Your Inventory Ties up Cash


You can’t sell your goods until you’ve purchased or built them and, whether your goods are sold or not, your vendor still expects to be paid. This means that your inventory is locking up your cash. You could eventually make two times or even three times your money on your inventory, but margins do not equal cash.


No. 6: You Must Be Practical About Working Capital


Working capital is the figure left over when current liabilities are deducted from current assets, which means it’s the money you have in your bank account available for meeting operating costs, paying vendors, and buying inventory - all the while waiting for your business customers to pay your invoices. Understanding and grasping the concept of working capital is a very necessary survival skill in business because being able to maintain sufficient cash to pay your own financial responsibilities whilst dealing with all the unknowns in business can be very tricky.


No. 7: Be Clear on What ""Accounts Receivable"" Actually Are


The money owed to you by your customers is called accounts receivable, which means the money that’s sitting in your customer’s bank account that belongs to you is called receivables. Just like inventory, the amount of money in your accounts receivable column is money you don’t have. Certainly, you’ve done the deal and you’ve sent the invoice, but now you’re waiting to be paid. You must remain very vigilant until such time as the invoice has been settled and the money is physically in your bank account.


8. Monitor the Health of Your Business Very Closely


Three aspects of your business that require close monitoring include -


-Inventory Turnover: Measure how long your inventory stays on your balance sheet without being converted to cash;


-Collection Days: Measure how long it takes to receive payment for services rendered or goods sold;


-Payment Days: Keep a record of how long you wait before paying suppliers.


Now, make a plan. Project these figures out to 12 or 18 months ahead then compare your plan to what actually occurs. This is a really great way of gaining some insight into your own business.


No. 9: Prepare for Financing before You Actually Need It


Don’t wait until you need financing to start reaching out to finance companies. Contact companies who provide financing, especially credit line financing, and look for products where interest is not payable if the money is not used. Don’t wait for your business to have cash flow issues. Waiting until you urgently need cash or a loan will subject you to higher interest rates and dodgy terms. Start the process while your business is healthy, which will allow you to negotiate finance terms from a position of strength. We strongly suggest you be proactive and find a partner ready to finance your business; a partner that’s prepared to grow with you.







Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles







Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles

Santa Clara Factoring Companies




Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles

Santa Clara Factoring Companies




Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles

Santa Clara, officially the City of Santa Clara, is a city in Santa Clara County, California, named after the Spanish mission that was established there in 1777. The city's population was 116,468 at the 2010 United States Census, making it the ninth most populous city in the San Francisco Bay Area.Located 45 miles (72 km) southeast of San Francisco, the city was founded in 1777 and incorporated in 1852. The city is the site of the eighth of 21 California missions, Mission Santa Clara de As�s, and was named after the mission.


The Mission and Mission Gardens are located on the grounds of Santa Clara University. Saint Clare is the patron saint of Santa Clara.[7]Santa Clara is located in the center of Silicon Valley and is home to the headquarters of several high tech companies. It is also home to Santa Clara University, the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of California. Levi's Stadium, the home of the 9ers and the future site of Super Bowl 50 and premier event Mania 31, is also located in the city. The city is bordered by San Jose, Sunnyvale, and Cupertino.Santa Clara owns and operates an electric utility called Silicon Valley Power. In 2005 Silicon Valley Power brought online the Donald Von Raesfeld (DVR) Power Plant. The new combined cycle gas turbine plant produces 147 megawatts of electricity for the city and its residents. As a result, the going rate for electricity in Santa Clara is considerably cheaper than that offered by Northern California's dominant utility, Pacific Gas and Electric.





Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles

The economy of California is large enough to be comparable to that of the largest of countries. FY 2011, the gross state product (GSP) is about $1.96 trillion, the largest in the United States. California is responsible for 13.1 percent of the United States' $14.96 trillion gross domestic product (GDP). California's GDP is larger than that of all but 8 countries in dollar terms (the United States, China, Japan, Germany, France, Brazil, the United Kingdom, and Italy).


California's GDP is larger than the GDPs of Russia, India, Canada, Australia, and Spain; in terms of Purchasing Power Parity,[103] it is larger than all but 9 countries (the United States, China, India, Japan, Germany, Russia, Brazil, France, the United Kingdom, Italy), larger than Mexico, South Korea, Spain, Canada, and Turkey. In terms of jobs, the five largest sectors in California are trade, transportation, and utilities; government; professional and business services; education and health services; and leisure and hospitality. In terms of output, the five largest sectors are financial services, followed by trade, transportation, and utilities; education and health services; government; and manufacturing. Agriculture is an important sector in California's economy. Farming-related sales more than quadrupled over the past three decades, from $7.3 billion in 1974 to nearly $31 billion in 2004.[107] This increase has occurred despite a 15 percent decline in acreage devoted to farming during the period, and water supply suffering from chronic instability.


Factors contributing to the growth in sales-per-acre include more intensive use of active farmlands and technological improvements in crop production.[107] In 2008, California's 81,500 farms and ranches generated $36.2 billion products revenue.[108] In 2011, that number grew to $43.5 billion products revenue.




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Santa Clara




Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles





Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles

The Basics of Invoice Factoring: Choosing a Factoring Company


Probably the biggest frustration for business to business (B2B) companies is waiting to get paid.Anyone involved in a seasonal business, long payment cycle, or lumpy cash flow will be able to relate to this statement. Some customers are very slow payers (of course corporate clients and governments come to mind!) and other customers demand generous terms.


Explaining Invoice Factoring


Basically, with invoice factoring your current but unpaid invoices are turned into cash – it’s a financing solution for businesses. Other terms used for factoring are ‘Accounts Receivable Financing’, ‘Invoice Financing ‘and ‘Receivables Financing’. Because many clients demand generous terms, it means that invoices can remain unpaid for anywhere between 30 and 90 days; while in the meantime you’re left without cash and falling behind on important expenses, such as payroll, and missing opportunities to grow your business. And this is where factoring comes in: factoring reduces, and sometimes eliminates the frustration of unpaid accounts.


A receivable financing transaction usually involves three parties, and these are the company that initially issues the invoice, the customer who is required to pay the invoice (otherwise known as the account debtor), and the ‘factor’, which is the financing company prepared to supply the cash.


Explaining Invoice Financing


An invoice is issued to a customer after a company has delivered a service or product. This invoice will now be sold to the factor and, in return, the company will receive a cash advance: this will usually be between 70% and 90% of the invoice’s value. With this cash the company finds it easier to pay employees; plus, it can now purchase supplies, materials, and inventory, and it can take on more work. Once the debtor pays their invoice the business will receive a rebate for the rest of the funds, less a fee which will be based on the value of the invoice and the term. This type of financial agreement benefits all three parties: the customer receives cash almost immediately, the debtor gets favorable payment terms, and the factoring company collects a fee.


Explaining the Difference between Traditional Bank Financing and Invoice Financing


There are, of course, both drawbacks and benefits to this type of financing for businesses. The obvious benefits of factoring are a simpler application process, quicker funding, and higher approval rates when compared to bank lending. Having access to cash allows a business to grow, to meet payroll, achieve supplier discounts for bulk purchases or early payment, and to purchase equipment in order to improve productivity.


Factoring has a very simple application process which eliminates some of the main hurdles placed on small businesses by banks. The speed of funding with factoring offers businesses the opportunity to take advantage of opportunities as they arise. In addition, the high approval rates with factoring means that many more businesses qualify, even though they may have previously been declined by a bank. Another bonus is that funds received from factoring invoices can be used to supplement bank credit, if necessary.


On the other hand, when it comes to cost, a line of credit at a bank is less expensive than factoring; this is assuming that the business will be successful in their application to the bank and that they’ll have access to the finance within a reasonable timeframe. Unfortunately, these applications are not always successful (four out of five companies are refused bank loans), while others find the whole process too discouraging.


Another possible issue with working with traditional factoring companies is that some of these companies will advise your customers that their invoices have been financed: this information can cause issues for some small businesses because they prefer to maintain control over all correspondence with their clients. Other factoring companies actually take control of your account receivables. Our advice is that you look for a factoring company that’s prepared to work on a non notification basis.


Receivables Financing Has Become Good Business Sense


Today we see factoring becoming quite commonplace in many industries, such as IT companies, professional services, wholesale trade, marketing, manufacturing companies and so on. Many, many industries are discovering the benefits of receivables financing.


Invoice factoring is an ideal solution for business to business companies who issue invoices payable within 15 to 90 days. Any B2B company who’s experiencing rapid growth, long payment cycles, or lumpy cash flow, will benefit the most from accounts receivable factoring. On the other hand, businesses and business to consumer (B2C) companies that are paid on delivery and don’t issue invoices would have no need of factoring services.


If you’re interested in invoice financing and believe it may be an option for your business, see below for our tips on how to approach working with a factoring company.


How to Work with an Invoice Factoring Company


There are many advantages to invoice financing, but it can be tricky working with some traditional factoring companies. Some factoring companies don’t have excellent customer service, and between confusing terms, long term contracts, monthly minimums, and hidden penalties, the experience can be quite daunting. Our aim is to ensure that you get a fair deal when working with a factoring company, and please remember that, as always, if a deal sounds too good to be true, then it probably is!


You’re Looking for Transparent Factoring Fees and Rates


Companies that make it difficult to work out their all inclusive fees are companies who are working for their own advantage, so when determining pricing, transparency is key. If you’re getting frustrated and not receiving direct answers, we suggest you move on to another factoring company that will be respectful of your time.


Another Word of Caution: Beware of receivables factoring companies who advertise low rates, which then increase when all their hidden fees come to light. We’ve heard of factoring companies who charge low monthly factoring rates, but you’ll be charged for two months’ even if the invoice was paid in one month and one day. We also know that some factors require monthly minimums, which means that you pay for financing even if it’s not required. We strongly suggest that you read our article on factoring rates and tricks so that you approach factoring with knowledge and awareness.


Understanding Penalties, and How to Avoid Them


Be aware that some invoice factoring companies out there have hidden penalties. In order to avoid these penalties, you need to know why they occur. If you believe these penalties are out of proportion or unfair, then move on to another factor. It won’t be long before you’ll understand what fair and reasonable terms look like.


Read the Fine Print in Your Contract


In order to guarantee their profits, most factoring companies will try to lock you into a long term contract. Obviously this is good business for the factoring company, but it may not be so good for your business. You need to know what you’re signing up for, so be aware of long term contracts where you’ll be charged exorbitant cancellation fees if you should decide to leave.


Also, be aware that some long term contracts include minimums, so consider this carefully: you may find yourself paying for something you’re not using when you only needed the factoring company to meet occasional cash flow needs. You shouldn’t be forced to remain with a service that’s not meeting your needs, so it’s vitally important that you carefully read the fine print.


Customer Confidentiality


Once you start your research on factoring you’ll discover that most factoring companies operate on a notification basis, which means that when you sell your invoices to the factor, they notify your customers. They’ll also ask that the funds be routed directly to the factoring company’s bank account, instead of your account. This can be an issue for business owners who prefer to have control of all communications with their customers. If discretion is important to you and your business,


we strongly suggest that your accounts receivable financing company provides non notification factoring, meaning that you retain control over customer communications. If this is not an option for your factoring company, then you need to move to a companythat will provide non notification factoring.


How Much Cash Will You Receive Upfront?


You’ll receive an advance upfront, which is a percentage of the face value of the invoice. This advance will probably be somewhere between 70% and 90% of the invoice’s face value. For example, let’s say your customer owes you $1000: your advance payment should be somewhere between $700 and $900.


Factoring Minimums Compared with Single Invoice Discounting


You’ll also notice in your research that many factors require small businesses to submit all invoices from certain customers. On the other hand, ‘single invoice discounting’, also known as ‘spot factoring’, means that the business concerned determines which invoices will be sent to the factoring company for advance payment. Make sure you understand your factoring company’s terms before you sign anything. Single invoice discounting or spot factoring is generally the preferred method for small businesses because it enables you to retain control over your financing by determining which invoices will be sent for factoring.


Choosing Your Factoring Company


Think about all the above criteria, and look for a business partner who will provide your business with the best combination of flexibility, features, and terms that you require. By doing a little research you’ll soon find a partner and an agreement that offers you the flexibility, funds, terms, and transparency that work best for you. Your aim is to find a partner that you’ll be happy to work with long term, so don’t settle for anything less.







Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles

Explaining ‘Factoring’


A ‘Factor’ is a third party commercial financial company who purchases the Accounts Receivable from businesses: this transaction is known as ‘Factoring’. Factoring exists so that businesses can receive a quick injection of cash, as opposed to waiting the 60 or 90 days for customers to pay their invoices. Factoring is also known as Accounts Receivable Financing, and Invoice Factoring.


The majority of factoring companies purchase invoices and advance money to the business within 24 hours; however, the nature and terms of factoring can (and do) differ among financial service providers and industries. Depending on your customers’ credit histories, your industry, and other specific criteria, the advance rate on your invoices can range from 80% to as high as 95%. The factoring company not only collects on your invoices; it also offers back office support to your business.Once the factoring company has collected on your customer’s invoice,you’ll be paid the balance of the invoice – less the factor’s fee for assuming the risk. The primary benefit of factoring is that businesses no longer need to wait anywhere between one and three months for a customer to pay their accounts: they now have access to cash in hand so they can operate and grow their business.The Advantages of Factoring


There are a few reasons why factoring has become an invaluable financial tool for many businesses, including start ups. As mentioned above, the main benefit is that businesses can now receive a quick boost to their cash flow because factoring companies, in general, will provide cash on accounts receivable within 24 hours. This resolves the problems businesses experience with short term cash flow, and in many ways this injection of cash can help to grow a business. Besides handling your customer collections, factoring companies can also evaluate your customers’ payment and credit histories.Other benefits of factoring include:


• It can be customized to a business’s needs and managed to ensure that capital is available when it’s needed;
• It’s not based on your own business or credit history: it’s based on the quality of your customers’ credit;
• It’s not based on your company’s net worth: it provides a line of credit based on sales;
• There’s no limit to the amount of financing, unlike conventional bank loans;
• This financing will not show up as a debt on your balance sheet, because it’s not a loan.
Who Uses Factoring?


Companies of all different sizes, including start ups, use factoring; and today factoring has become common business practice across many industries. Factoring is now widely used in the transportation industry, including manufacturing, textiles, trucking, oilfield services, wholesale and distribution, and staffing agencies. Interestingly, factoring receivables is practiced in many countries around the world and has a long history of success.


Can I Factor? My Company’s New, with No Financial History


Yes, you can! In fact, factoring has become an excellent tool for start up companies because no company credit history or balance sheet is required. It’s not really your company’s finances that the factoring company is concerned with; they’ll base their financing on your customers’ payment histories and credit scores.


What Percentage of My Invoices Should I Factor?


The answer to this question really depends on the unique needs of your business. Some companies only factor invoices for customers who typically take a long time to pay, while others factor all their invoices. The receivables that a company can factor range anywhere from a few thousand dollars to millions of dollars each and every month.


What’s the Difference between Factoring and a Bank Loan?


• The difference between factoring and a bank loan is that you’re not assuming any debt with factoring because it’s not a loan;
• With factoring, there’s no emphasis on your balance sheet – it’s all on your customer’s invoices;
• In addition, a bank loan is typically one lump sum, whereas factoring provides a steady flow of funds;
• Factoring companies can also help improve your company’s balance sheet by assisting with your credit and collection functions;
• A bank loan adds to your debt, whereas factoring converts receivables (an asset) into cash (another asset);
• And of course, bank loans can be very difficult to get because they’re limited by your balance sheet.
How Do You Start the Factoring Process?


The factoring process can be very simple to set up. The customer will be asked to complete a short application form, and may be required to follow up with other reports and documents.


Recourse and Non Recourse Factoring: What’s the Difference?


• With Recourse factoring the client is ultimately responsibility for the payment of the invoice; whereas
• With Non Recourse factoring, the factoring company accepts responsibility for the risk of collecting the invoice.It’s important to note that some factoring companies over offer both types of factoring – recourse and non recourse.


What Are the Contract Terms and Fees Applicable with Factoring?


There are different fee structures with different factoring companies: some factors charge an overall factoring fee which is determined by the creditworthiness of your customers and the monthly volume of invoices; while others charge additional fees to cover shipping, money transfers, and other costs associated with doing business. Before signing with any factoring company make sure you understand the fees and terms applicable to your contract. Also note that most factoring contacts are renewed annually.


Do I Need Credit Insurance on Debtors?


Insurance is not typically required, but in specific circumstances it may be.






Tulsa Factoring Companies Articles

Oilfield Services Factoring Services


Running a company in the oilfield services industry is no easy business, especially with payrolls to meet, equipment to purchase and deadlines that must be met. The sheer complexity of combining the geological research and modeling, imaging and exploration and finally the drilling to see whether oil is really present can take a lot of investment before any payoff can be seen.


For those who own a Frac Sand Hauler for example, the efforts that must be put in to start such as business can be considerable. But arguably the biggest challenge is paying the expenses as the invoices come in. A Frac Sand Hauler often has expenses that must be met immediately, but their invoices can take up to 60 days before they see the money.


What follows is an interview with Ray McClerand, a man who owns a Frac Sand Hauler business and ran into the same difficulties that many new companies of his type face. How Ray overcome some of the challenges in paying his bills through oil service factoring are explained in the interview.


“Welcome Ray, I’d like to know first why you decided to start up a Frac Sand Hauler company and how you prepared for the challenges it created.”


Ray McClerand (RM): “I’ve been in the oil business for the past 15 years or so working on different jobs from roughneck to foreman to deskwork for different companies. A few years ago I saw the potential of having a Frac Sand Hauler business in this area and got together with a couple of partners to create a company. We sat down, went over the details and decided that this would be a real good time to build a business that was serving a particular need in this industry.”


“So, I take it you created a business plan and took out the appropriate loans in order to purchase the equipment and hire the personnel necessary to get your company started?”


RM: “Exactly. Because I had been around this business for a while, I understood what was needed in terms of personnel and equipment. Plus, I had some contacts with others in the business that needed the type of services that a Frac Sand Hauler provides, so I felt that there was some real potential to make a profitable business work.”


“How did it go over the first six months or so?”


RM: “At first, we were really thriving as my contacts had lined up some business my way. Our loans covered the first six months or so of operations and we were doing quite well with the business we had. My partners and I were certainly happy and everything was going good when something really strange happened.”


“Could you elaborate on what you mean by “strange”?


RM: “Yes, after the first five months or so I started getting requests to have our company work with several other businesses in the area. This would mean having to expand our company through buying new equipment and hiring more people. But we did not have the cash on hand to make such a move. We were getting invoices from the businesses that we worked with, but it was taking up to 2 full months before we actually got the cash.”


“So, you were making enough money to expand, but you didn’t have it on hand because of the invoice system?”


RM: “You got it. Add to that our initial money from the loan was running out and we needed to start paying it back as well. I knew that if we didn’t expand and accept the new business that others would step in and we would lose that money. So, we were in a real pickle until I heard about oil service factoring companies.”


“Tell us a bit about oil service factoring and how it helped you out?”


RM: “Well, one of my partners had heard about factoring companies, so we checked it out and decided to go with one that was best suited for our needs. A factoring company buys our invoices with cash so we have money on hand to pay our bills and do what we need accomplished immediately. The factoring company then collects the money from the invoices when they become due. It’s really been a win-win for what we do.”


“That’s interesting. I wonder if you could you explain a little further just how factoring has helped your company?”


RM: “Sure, instead of having to wait up to 60 days before we could collect on the invoices, we were able to have the cash on hand immediately to purchase some new equipment and hire some more people to expand our business. This meant that we could accept the new offers that other businesses were providing for us and not having to pass. I cannot say enough about how factoring really benefitted us when it came to expanding our business.”


“So, it seems like factoring really paid off for you. Do you still use factoring today?”


RM: “Yes we do. Although for the most part we still cash our own invoices, whenever we need money quickly so we can buy some new equipment or expand our business a little further, we go back to the factoring company and cash in our upcoming invoices. It really has worked wonders for our company.”


“Tell me, what would have happened if factoring was not an option?”


RM: Frankly, I don’t know how we could be in the position we are today without factoring. In this business, you have to take advantage of new opportunities quickly because there are other companies out there who will step in if you don’t. Basically, I don’t think we would be anywhere near the company we are today if it had not been for factoring.


There is little doubt that Ray’s company would not be where it was without oil service factoring that allowed him to expand his company when he needed. For those in the oil industry, having your invoices cashed immediately by factoring companies allows greater flexibility so you can grow your business a lot more quickly and take advantage of opportunities.





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